Does BJJ teach takedowns?

There is a lot of debate surrounding Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu these days. Does it teach takedowns? Does it focus too much on ground fighting? And the big question - can you use BJJ to defend yourself in a real-world situation?

In this blog post, we will take a closer look at Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and see if it does teach takedowns.

Does BJJ teach takedowns? (Submission Shark

Does BJJ teach takedowns?

The answer is yes and no. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu does teach takedowns, but it also focuses on ground fighting. There is, however, no striking in BJJ. So, if you are looking for a complete self-defense system that involves striking, BJJ may not be the right choice for you.

However, if you want to learn how to take an opponent down to the ground and then submit them, BJJ is an excellent choice.

This does also depends on the instructor. Many BJJ instructors will teach takedowns along with 'break falls' to help the practitioner learn how to distribute their weight to lower the impact.

What is a 'break fall' in BJJ?

A break fall is a technique used to lower the impact of a fall. It is important in BJJ because many techniques, such as submissions, involve being taken to the ground. If you don't know how to break fall, you could potentially injure yourself when practicing these techniques.

Is pulling guard a type of takedown?

Most people would say no, but in BJJ, pulling guard is a valid tactic. Many BJJ practitioners believe that pulling a guard is the best way to take an opponent down.

It does take the fight to the ground and can position the practitioner to set up submissions. It may not be as devastating in terms of impact but it is a very effective way to take an opponent down.

What types of takedowns are there in BJJ?

There are many different types of takedowns in BJJ. You have your basic wrestling takedowns, such as the double leg and single-leg takedown.

You also have Judo throws, which can be very effective in BJJ. And finally, you have Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu-specific takedowns, such as the flying armbar and the guard pull.

So, as you can see, there is no shortage of takedowns in BJJ. Does this mean that BJJ is the best martial art for takedowns? Not necessarily. It all depends on your personal goals and preferences.

Some people prefer to stick to wrestling takedowns because they are more simple and easier to learn. Others prefer the more complex Judo throws. And finally, some people prefer the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu specific takedowns because they are more effective in a real-world situation.

It depends on what you are looking for in martial art. If you want to focus on takedowns, then BJJ is a great choice. But if you are looking for a complete self-defense system, you may want to look elsewhere or train a combination of martial arts.

There are many takedowns in BJJ, but some of the most common ones include:

The double leg takedown: This is a basic wrestling takedown that involves taking your opponent down by wrapping your arms around their legs and lifting them off the ground.

The single-leg takedown: This is a variation of the double leg takedown, but it only uses one arm to take your opponent down.

Judo Throw (Submission Shark)

The hip toss: This is a Judo throw that involves flipping your opponent over your hip.

The sweep: This is a basic grappling move that involves taking your opponent off balance and sweeping them to the ground.

The trip: This is a basic takedown that involves tripping your opponent and controlling them as they fall to the ground.

All of these takedowns can be used to take an opponent down to the ground. However, it is important to note that BJJ is a ground fighting system, so most of the takedowns are focused on getting an opponent to the ground.

If you are interested in learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, it is important to do your research and find an instructor who can teach you the basics of takedowns. Many BJJ schools also offer beginner classes that will teach you the basic techniques of this martial art.

Flying Submissions: One of the most popular takedowns in BJJ is the flying armbar. This is a move that involves jumping on your opponent and locking your arm around their neck before twisting into the submission.

This takedown is very effective because it catches your opponent by surprise and puts them in a very bad position. It is also very flashy and can be a great way to impress your friends and family.

The flying armbar is just one example of a BJJ-specific takedown. There are many different takedowns that you can learn in this martial art, and each one is designed to take your opponent down to the ground.

Can you take someone down with a judo throw in Brazilian jiu-jitsu?

Yes, you can take someone down with judo in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. However, it is important to note that BJJ is a ground fighting system, so most of the takedowns are focused on getting an opponent to the ground.

Many schools will have partners start on the ground while rolling (sparring). This can help avoid potential injuries and is preferred when there is not much room on the mats. For competition-specific training, athletes will most likely practice starting in a stand-up position to simulate the rules of the tournament.

(BJJ Sweep)  ~ Submission Shark

Does BJJ teach takedowns (summary)

Yes and no. It all depends on what your goals are. If you want to learn how to take an opponent down and then submit them, BJJ is a great option. However, if you are looking for a complete self-defense system, there are better choices such as submission wrestling.

It's important to remember that in self-defense scenarios, the aggressor may be a better striker than you are, and taking the fight to the ground by closing the distance may save you from physical assault. 

BJJ specializes in ground fighting techniques and does teach takedowns, but if you are looking to improve upon your takedowns further, consider adding judo or wrestling to your training program.


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